Archive for the ‘Baseball’ Category

Commie Ball

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

Vanity Fair (July 2008)

Some of the greatest baseball players the world has never seen are in Cuba, where their talent is government property, and their only chance of turning pro is the risky boat ride to Florida. Gus Dominguez, an L.A. sports agent, has done more than anyone to help escaped players join major-league U.S. teams, but now he sits in a California jail, convicted of smuggling athletes. The author flies to Havana for an unprecedented scouting of the island’s stars as he reports on the twisted dynamics behind the Dominguez case.

via Commie Ball: A Journey to the End of a Revolution – Vanity Fair

Baseball’s Losing Formula

Saturday, November 3rd, 2007

New York Times (November 3, 2007)

The Colorado Rockies’ appearance in the World Series last month may have looked like evidence of success for revenue-sharing. Like the Oakland Athletics, the Minnesota Twins, the Detroit Tigers and the San Diego Padres last year, a small-market team proved competitive enough to reach the playoffs. But revenue sharing, as it is now structured, actually makes lasting success less likely for all five of these teams.

via Baseball’s Losing Formula – New York Times

Absolutely, Power Corrupts

Sunday, April 24th, 2005

New York Times Magazine (April 24, 2005)

He could live with being the least likely player on the field to hit the ball over the wall; what drove him nuts was the thought of bigger players using drugs to widen the power gap even further between him and them. The season before, he’d actually watched some hulking bomber taking batting practice hit a high fly ball to the warning track, turn to a teammate and, referring to a steroid, say, ”One cycle of Deca and that’s out.” And he had no doubt that the slugger would make sure that, next time, the ball left the park.

via The New York Times > Magazine > Absolutely, Power Corrupts

Coach Fitz's Management Theory

Sunday, March 28th, 2004

New York Times (March 28, 2004)

A few people, and a few experiences, simply refuse to be trivialized by time. There are teachers with a rare ability to enter a child’s mind; it’s as if their ability to get there at all gives them the right to stay forever. I once had such a teacher. His name was Billy Fitzgerald, but everybody just called him Coach Fitz.

via Coach Fitz’s Management Theory – New York Times

The Trading Desk

Sunday, March 30th, 2003

New York Times (March 30, 2003)

This article is adapted from ”Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game,” published in May 2003 by W.W. Norton & Co.

The next day, when Billy Beane sits upright in his office, a few yards from Oakland’s Coliseum, he faces a wall covered entirely by a white board and, on it, the names of the several hundred players controlled by the Oakland A’s. Mike Magnante’s name is still on that board. Swiveling around to his rear, he faces another white board with the names of the nearly 1,200 players on other major league rosters. Ricardo Rincon’s name is on that board. At this point in the year Beane doesn’t really need to look at these boards to make connections; he knows every player on other teams that he wants, and every player in his own system that he doesn’t want. The trick is to persuade other teams to buy his guys for more than they are worth and to sell their guys for less than they are worth.

via The Trading Desk – New York Times